protect against facial recognition - anti-facial recognition technology

Facial Recognition and Loosing Face

In Artificial Intelligence (AI), Game Changers, Quick Read, Tech4Good by ScottLeave a Comment

Interesting Tech Company Profile: 

Protecting Against Facial Recognition

I've talked about facial recognition a few times on this site,  there's even a video of me testing out a supposedly anti-facial recognition T-Shirt, and more recently, I saw another news article on the topic which had enough academic weight to be plausible.

As these personal technologies develop we might find new ways to protect our own privacy, but what if your private data was leaked by a trusted third party? 

We share our photos for genuine reasons with all sorts of organisations, from government agencies to fitness centres, but it only takes for one of those to suffer a major breach for things to become very difficult for us.

Company Insights:

D-ID

  • Tel Aviv
  • ~27
  • 22.9M over 4 rounds
  • Tech4Good (Privacy)
  • GameChanger (AI)
  • Digital (app)
  • Connectivity

Whilst passwords have their limitations, if we know a password has been compromised, we can change it. If our facial characteristics and geometry has been leaked, it is very difficult to get a new face, and with an increasing number of organisations using our faces as biometric identification, the risk is growing all the time.

The company I picked to write about today helps responsible organisations protect and secure facial imagery against malicious use by altering the images in a way that is imperceivable to the human eye, whilst making it very difficult for artificial intelligence facial recognition systems to interpret successfully.

more abouT: 

D-ID

D-ID (which stands for de-identification) have created a technique that removes biometric identification data from stored photo or video material, whilst maintaining the key attributes us humans look for in a photo, such as age, gender, emotion etc.

The technology is provided as a service to institutions that need to store photographic information, but have a obligation to protect that data from malicious use. 

The types of organisations this applies to is growing every day, and already covers financial and legal organisations that need to follow know-you-customer (KYC) regulations, driver agencies for licensing, fitnesses clubs, and any organisation that uses photo-ID on their employee identification cards, or publishes photos or videos of staff online. 

Quite frankly, my face is so far across the Internet already, I'd love to use this to D-ID myself!

Do you work for D-ID?

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